The State of Windows 8

Only Microsoft knows how the next version of its Windows operating system will look and what it will be called, but big changes could be ahead for the OS that observers refer to as “Windows 8.”
At this year’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Microsoft announced that Windows 8 will support system-on-a-chip architectures using ARM processors. Unlike the x86 architecture that today’s Windows laptops and desktops work with, ARM-based chips tend to run such low-power devices as tablets and smartphones.
In his CES keynote speech, Microsoft CEO Steve Ball­mer said, “This announcement is really all about enabling a new class of hardware, and new silicon partners for Windows, to bring the widest possible range of form factors to the market.”
In other words, Windows won’t be just for laptops and desktops anymore.
Actual Facts
Microsoft’s ARM announcement represents the firm’s only officially released factual detail about Windows 8. Consistent with it, the company named Nvidia, Qualcomm, and Texas Instruments as silicon partners, so Windows devices built upon their three low-power platforms are likely.
At an architectural summit in London last year, Microsoft en­­couraged the idea of virtualizing Windows more heavily, possibly storing apps, data, Windows settings, and parts of the OS itself in the cloud.
Rumors
No rumor about Windows 8 is more precise than a series of leaked slides that supposedly provide a blueprint for Microsoft’s next OS. The slides alone don’t indicate final features of Windows 8, but they do show where Microsoft is headed, especially since other reports have corroborated them.
One slide, for example, talks about an OS that follows users wherever they go; instead of being tethered to hardware, users may roam between desktops, laptops, and tablets in whatever way is most convenient.
Another slide speaks of a reset button that preserves apps and settings while wiping out viruses and other hindrances. Some industry watchers suggest that storing apps and data in the cloud could make this feature possible.
As for Microsoft’s goal of “instant on” computing, blogger Manan Kakkar spotted a Microsoft patent for using a hypervisor-another virtualization method-to split the operating system into a general-purpose OS and a number of appliancelike applications, such as for TVs and tablets. Those uses, Kakkar says, could switch on instantly even if the core OS took 30 seconds to start up.
How will Microsoft achieve these lightweight versions of its operating system? A ru­­mor circulated by Paul Thurrott posits that Windows 8 will introduce a tile-based interface called “Mosh” to serve as an alternative UI for tablets and other low-power touchscreen devices.
We’ve also heard rumblings about a new application de­­velopment framework code-named “Jupiter,” whose goal is to help developers create dynamic, visually appealing, and immersive applications for a forthcoming Windows app store. It may also be an attempt by Microsoft to enable developers to create apps that work on both traditional x86-based CPUs and ARM-based processors without extensive recompiling and reprogramming.
Speculation
If you doubt whether Windows 8 will be a profoundly different operating system from its predecessors, consider this breathless bit of hype that briefly appeared on a Microsoft developer’s blog in 2009:
“The minimum that folks can take for granted is that the next version will be something completely different from what folks usually expect of Windows…The themes that have been floated truly reflect what people have been looking [for] for years and it will change the way people think about PCs and the way they use them. It is the future of PCs.”
Microsoft quickly removed the blog, as if to erase the evidence. So is the company really trying to shake things up with Windows 8?
The Big Picture
Microsoft clearly wants to create an operating system that scales between devices. ARM support provides the foundation, and cloud services could be a major building block. The challenge for Microsoft will be to leave the core Windows experience and legacy compatibility intact while also pursuing its lofty ambitions.
A final rumor: Reportedly, Microsoft is targeting a 2012 release for Windows 8. Think the company can get everything figured out by then?

The State of Windows 8Beneath a thin surface layer of established fact about Microsoft’s next OS lies a deep pool of rumor and speculation. We plunge in to test the water.By Jared Newman, PCWorld    Jan 25, 2011 5:00 am
Only Microsoft knows how the next version of its Windows operating system will look and what it will be called, but big changes could be ahead for the OS that observers refer to as “Windows 8.”
At this year’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Microsoft announced that Windows 8 will support system-on-a-chip architectures using ARM processors. Unlike the x86 architecture that today’s Windows laptops and desktops work with, ARM-based chips tend to run such low-power devices as tablets and smartphones.
In his CES keynote speech, Microsoft CEO Steve Ball­mer said, “This announcement is really all about enabling a new class of hardware, and new silicon partners for Windows, to bring the widest possible range of form factors to the market.”
In other words, Windows won’t be just for laptops and desktops anymore.
Actual FactsMicrosoft’s ARM announcement represents the firm’s only officially released factual detail about Windows 8. Consistent with it, the company named Nvidia, Qualcomm, and Texas Instruments as silicon partners, so Windows devices built upon their three low-power platforms are likely.
At an architectural summit in London last year, Microsoft en­­couraged the idea of virtualizing Windows more heavily, possibly storing apps, data, Windows settings, and parts of the OS itself in the cloud.
RumorsNo rumor about Windows 8 is more precise than a series of leaked slides that supposedly provide a blueprint for Microsoft’s next OS. The slides alone don’t indicate final features of Windows 8, but they do show where Microsoft is headed, especially since other reports have corroborated them.
One slide, for example, talks about an OS that follows users wherever they go; instead of being tethered to hardware, users may roam between desktops, laptops, and tablets in whatever way is most convenient.
Another slide speaks of a reset button that preserves apps and settings while wiping out viruses and other hindrances. Some industry watchers suggest that storing apps and data in the cloud could make this feature possible.
As for Microsoft’s goal of “instant on” computing, blogger Manan Kakkar spotted a Microsoft patent for using a hypervisor-another virtualization method-to split the operating system into a general-purpose OS and a number of appliancelike applications, such as for TVs and tablets. Those uses, Kakkar says, could switch on instantly even if the core OS took 30 seconds to start up.
How will Microsoft achieve these lightweight versions of its operating system? A ru­­mor circulated by Paul Thurrott posits that Windows 8 will introduce a tile-based interface called “Mosh” to serve as an alternative UI for tablets and other low-power touchscreen devices.
We’ve also heard rumblings about a new application de­­velopment framework code-named “Jupiter,” whose goal is to help developers create dynamic, visually appealing, and immersive applications for a forthcoming Windows app store. It may also be an attempt by Microsoft to enable developers to create apps that work on both traditional x86-based CPUs and ARM-based processors without extensive recompiling and reprogramming.
SpeculationIf you doubt whether Windows 8 will be a profoundly different operating system from its predecessors, consider this breathless bit of hype that briefly appeared on a Microsoft developer’s blog in 2009:
“The minimum that folks can take for granted is that the next version will be something completely different from what folks usually expect of Windows…The themes that have been floated truly reflect what people have been looking [for] for years and it will change the way people think about PCs and the way they use them. It is the future of PCs.”
Microsoft quickly removed the blog, as if to erase the evidence. So is the company really trying to shake things up with Windows 8?
The Big PictureMicrosoft clearly wants to create an operating system that scales between devices. ARM support provides the foundation, and cloud services could be a major building block. The challenge for Microsoft will be to leave the core Windows experience and legacy compatibility intact while also pursuing its lofty ambitions.
A final rumor: Reportedly, Microsoft is targeting a 2012 release for Windows 8. Think the company can get everything figured out by then?

Source : www.pcworld.com

Intel finds Sandy Bridge chipset design flaw, shipments stopped and recalls beginning

A problem requiring a “silicon fix” is bad news in the chipset business, and sadly that’s what Intel is announcing. Its new Intel 6 Series chipset, Cougar Point, has been found to have a flaw, something to do with the SATA controller. Intel is indicating that the ports can “degrade over time,” leading to poor i/o performance down the road. All shipments have been stopped and a fix has been implemented for new deliveries, but it sounds like recalls will be starting soon for those with this ticking time bomb silicon within. It isn’t a critical problem right now, though, so if you own a Sandy Bridge Core i5 or Core i7 system keep computing with confidence while looking for a recall notice, but it is bad news for Intel’s bottom line: the company is advising a $300 million hit to revenue.

Family Processor Number Code Name
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor i7-2655LE Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor i7-2610UE Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i5 Mobile Processor i5-2540M Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i5 Mobile Processor i5-2520M Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor i7-2620M Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i3 Desktop Processor i3-2100 Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i3 Desktop Processor i3-2100T Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i3 Desktop Processor i3-2120 Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i5 Desktop Processor i5-2390T Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i5 Mobile Processor i5-2510E Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor i7-2629M Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor i7-2649M Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor i7-2657M Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor i7-2617M Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i5 Mobile Processor i5-2537M Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i5 Mobile Processor i5-2515E Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor i7-2720QM Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i5 Desktop Processor i5-2300 Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i5 Desktop Processor i5-2400 Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i5 Desktop Processor i5-2400S Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i5 Desktop Processor i5-2500 Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i5 Desktop Processor i5-2500K Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i5 Desktop Processor i5-2500S Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i5 Desktop Processor i5-2500T Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Desktop Processor i7-2600 Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Desktop Processor i7-2600K Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Desktop Processor i7-2600S Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor i7-2630QM Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor i7-2820QM Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor Extreme Edition i7-2920XM Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor i7-2635QM Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor i7-2710QE Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i7 Mobile Processor i7-2715QE Sandy Bridge
Intel® Core™ i3 Mobile Processor i3-2310E Sandy Bridge

Source: engadget

IIS Express Windows Authentication

option-1: edit My Documents\IISExpress\config\applicationhost.config file and enable windowsAuthentication

option-2: Unlock windowsAuthentication section in My Documents\IISExpress\config\applicationhost.config and add following in web.config

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration>
    <system.webServer>
    <security>
      <authentication>
        <windowsAuthentication enabled="true" />
      </authentication>
    </security>
    </system.webServer>
</configuration>

Using IIS Express 7.5 in VS.NET

A Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack (which at the time of writing this beta version of its proposed), a new option to right click menu on project name in the name of VS.NET Use IIS Express, has added up could be easily This new option can be used (or in other words is integrated with IIS Express and requires no special regulation).
In other states (and copies, and that there will be no integration) can be acted as follows:
First method:
Following command on the command line Enter:
“C:\Program Files\IIS Express\iisexpress.exe” /path:D:\Projects\Test\MySiteTest\ /port:4986 /clr:v4.0

The case for providing accessible web server path mentioned site on port 4986(http://localhost:4986/) based on NET 4 will be established (for example for three and a half NET v3.5 Enter amount .)
Second method:
which in fact provide the first method behind the scenes it is temporary.
A) The first path My Documents \ IISExpress \ config file referred applicationhost.config open. Then tie the findings related to the site (about 153 rows) and select delete serverAutoStart:
<site name="WebSite1" id="1">
              <application path="/">
                  <virtualDirectory path="/" physicalPath="%IIS_SITES_HOME%\WebSite1" />
              </application>
              <bindings>
                  <binding protocol="http" bindingInformation=":8080:localhost" />
              </bindings>
</site>

B) setting the desired site to manually add the file. For example:

<site name="WebSite2" id="2">
              <application path="/" applicationPool="Clr4IntegratedAppPool">
                  <virtualDirectory path="/" physicalPath="D:\Projects\Test\MySiteTest" />
              </application>
              <bindings>
                  <binding protocol="http" bindingInformation=":Test:localhost" />
              </bindings>
</site>